A Clash of Kings

By George R. R. Martin

“Power resides only where men believe it resides. […] A shadow on the wall, yet shadows can kill. And ofttimes a very small man can cast a very large shadow.” – George R.R. Martin

The second book of the A Song of Ice and Fire series.

I finished this book two days ago, after about 2 or 3 months of having started it. It was mainly because it has so many stories and so much content you have to connect the dots so you don’t get lost further on. Also because it’s one of the longest books I’ve read and I had trouble finding time to read it.

This book picks up after the tragedy that occurs to the Stark family after the events of A Game of Thrones. A new King is crowned at King’s Landing, even though people know the throne is in the wrong hands. But not only that happens: a red comet appears in the sky, and in every corner of the Realm everyone believes it means something different. To some, it symbolises hope, to others a sign of the gods, and to others a call for revenge.

As always, George R.R. Martin takes us on a journey through every part of Westeros. On this book, he took us to King’s Landing, Dragonstone, Harrenhall, and even beyond the Wall. With stories from Sansa, Tyrion, the new knight Davos, Arya, Daenerys, Bran, Catelyn and Theon, he once again told us a story of betrayal, revenge, hunger for power, and overcoming one’s limits.

We could explore more about the royal court, the Lannisters’ past, Joffrey Baratheon, and the Tyrells, as well as the struggle for power between the Baratheon brothers and the temptation of the sorceress Melisandre.I believe each character must be read beyond what is written in the book. Tyrion, for example, is the most misunderstood character I’ve read about: he was born in a time and family where people like him were mistreated and seen as less, but he definitely used that to his advantage. Also, Arya Stark’s was one of the characters with the most development in the whole book and whom I’ve connected the most with. She went from being seen as a Winterfell “Lady”, to the broken person she became at Harrenhall. Finally, Daenerys, who in a world where women are treated as less, she became a strong leader and became respected among many both Dothraki and non-Dothraki.

One of the strong points George R.R. Martin has are his well-developed characters. I believe each of them must be read beyond what is written in the book. Tyrion, for example, is the most misunderstood character I’ve read about: he was born in a time and family where people like him were mistreated and seen as less, but he definitely used that to his advantage. Also, Arya Stark’s was the one whom I’ve connected the most with. She went from being seen as a Winterfell “Lady”, to the broken person she became at Harrenhall. Finally, Daenerys, who in a world where women are treated as less, she became a strong leader and became respected among many both Dothraki and non-Dothraki.

This book was a rollercoaster of emotions, lots of ups and downs, turns, loops and dark tunnels. I was confused in many parts and lost track of some things, but in the end it all adds up and forms a completely different story.

I give it a 4/5, and recommend it to people of ages 15+

Martin, G. (2015). A Clash of Kings. New York: Bantam Books.

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